Notes by Autumn Light

On Hebrew, English, translation, editing, and more—by Jonathan Orr-Stav

Is it true that in the earliest Hebrew texts that the word used to denote the holy spirit was feminine in form?

4 Comments

The Hebrew term ruaḥ haqodesh רוח הקודש still is feminine—grammatically speaking. But it doesn’t have the same meaning as in Christianity, where it was elevated to one of the Trinity or a manifestation of God, so the notion that you may be implying that God was perhaps originally conceived in Judaism as a feminine entity is a non-starter.

In Judaism, the holy spirit is merely of a type of connection or communication between God and man, similar to the ‘divine voice’, and therefore usually associated with prophets.

*

(Originally written in reply to a question at Quora.com).

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Author: יונתן אור-סתיו | Jonathan Orr-Stav

Hebrew-English translator, editor, author. מתרגם עברית–אנגלית, עורך באנגלית, וסופר.

4 thoughts on “Is it true that in the earliest Hebrew texts that the word used to denote the holy spirit was feminine in form?

  1. If God isn’t feminine or female, then what is the source of the first woman’s femininity?

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  2. Orthodox Judaism* has no problem with the statement that God is masculine. Indeed, one of the blessings that an observant Jewish man says every day is ברוך שלא עשני אשה – “Blessed be He that He did not make me a woman”

    * not my view, btw

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